The Nonverbal Processing of Actions Is an Area of Relative Strength in the Semantic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia.

TitleThe Nonverbal Processing of Actions Is an Area of Relative Strength in the Semantic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuteursAuclair-Ouellet, N, Fossard, M, Macoir, J, Laforce, Jr, R
JournalJ Speech Lang Hear Res
Pagination1-16
Date Published2020 Feb 04
ISSN1558-9102
Abstract

Purpose Better performance for actions compared to objects has been reported in the semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA). This study investigated the influence of the assessment task (naming, semantic picture matching) over the dissociation between objects and actions. Method Ten individuals with svPPA and 17 matched controls completed object and action naming tests, and object and action semantic picture matching tests. Performance was compared between the svPPA and control groups, within the svPPA group, and for each participant with svPPA versus the control group individually. Results Compared to controls, participants with svPPA were impaired on object and action naming, and object and action semantic picture matching. As a group, participants with svPPA had an advantage for actions over objects and for semantic picture matching tests over naming tests. Eight participants had a better performance for actions compared to objects in naming, with three showing a significant difference. Nine participants had a better performance for actions compared to objects in semantic picture matching, with six showing a significant difference. For objects, semantic picture matching was better than naming in nine participants, with five showing a significant difference. For actions, semantic picture matching was better than naming in all 10 participants, with nine showing a significant difference. Conclusion The nonverbal processing of actions, as assessed with a semantic picture matching test, is an area of relative strength in svPPA. Clinical implications for assessment planning and interpretation and theoretical implications for current models of semantic cognition are discussed.

DOI10.1044/2019_JSLHR-19-00271
Alternate JournalJ. Speech Lang. Hear. Res.
PubMed ID32013713