Inhibition of Protein Kinases AKT and ERK1/2 Reduce the Carotid Body Chemoreceptor Response to Hypoxia in Adult Rats.

TitleInhibition of Protein Kinases AKT and ERK1/2 Reduce the Carotid Body Chemoreceptor Response to Hypoxia in Adult Rats.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuteursIturri, P, Joseph, V, Rodrigo, G, Bairam, A, Soliz, J
JournalAdv Exp Med Biol
Volume860
Pagination269-77
Date Published2015
ISSN0065-2598
KeywordsAnimals, Butadienes, Carotid Body, Chromones, Hypoxia, Male, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3, Morpholines, Nitriles, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Abstract

The carotid body is the main mammalian oxygen-sensing organ regulating ventilation. Despite the carotid body is subjected of extensive anatomical and functional studies, little is yet known about the molecular pathways signaling the neurotransmission and neuromodulation of the chemoreflex activity. As kinases are molecules widely involved in motioning a broad number of neural processes, here we hypothesized that pathways of protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases ½ (ERK1/2) are implicated in the carotid body response to hypoxia. This hypothesis was tested using the in-vitro carotid body/carotid sinus nerve preparation ("en bloc") from Sprague Dawley adult rats. Preparations were incubated for 60 min in tyrode perfusion solution (control) or containing 1 μM of LY294002 (AKT inhibitor), or 1 μM of UO-126 (ERK1/2 inhibitor). The carotid sinus nerve chemoreceptor discharge rate was recorded under baseline (perfusion solution bubbled with 5 % CO(2) balanced in O(2)) and hypoxic (perfusion solution bubbled with 5 % CO(2) balanced in N(2)) conditions. Compared to control, both inhibitors significantly decreased the normoxic and hypoxic carotid body chemoreceptor activity. LY294002- reduced carotid sinus nerve discharge rate in hypoxia by about 20 %, while UO-126 reduces the hypoxic response by 45 %. We concluded that both AKT and ERK1/2 pathways are crucial for the carotid body intracellular signaling process in response to hypoxia.

DOI10.1007/978-3-319-18440-1_31
Alternate JournalAdv. Exp. Med. Biol.
PubMed ID26303491
Grant ListMOP-130258 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada
MOP-26974 / / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / Canada