Dietary intake of branched-chain amino acids in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: Effects on survival, behavior, and neuropathology.

TitleDietary intake of branched-chain amino acids in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease: Effects on survival, behavior, and neuropathology.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursTournissac, M, Vandal, M, Tremblay, C, Bourassa, P, Vancassel, S, Emond, V, Gangloff, A, Calon, F
JournalAlzheimers Dement (N Y)
Volume4
Pagination677-687
Date Published2018
ISSN2352-8737
Abstract

Introduction: High levels of plasmatic branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), commonly used as dietary supplements, are linked to metabolic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). BCAA directly influence amino acid transport to the brain and, therefore, neurotransmitter levels. We thus investigated the impact of BCAA on AD neuropathology in a mouse model.Methods: 3xTg-AD mice were fed either a control diet or a high-fat diet from 6 to 18 months of age. For the last 2 months, dietary BCAA content was adjusted to high (+50%), normal (+0%), or low (-50%).Results: Mice fed a BCAA-supplemented high-fat diet displayed higher tau neuropathology and only four out of 13 survived. Mice on the low-BCAA diet showed higher threonine and tryptophan cortical levels while performing better on the novel object recognition task.Discussion: These preclinical data underscore a potential risk of combining high-fat and high BCAA consumption, and possible benefits from BCAA restriction in AD.

DOI10.1016/j.trci.2018.10.005
Alternate JournalAlzheimers Dement (N Y)
PubMed ID30560200
PubMed Central IDPMC6290124