Brain-derived erythropoietin protects from intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiorespiratory dysfunction and oxidative stress in mice.

TitleBrain-derived erythropoietin protects from intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiorespiratory dysfunction and oxidative stress in mice.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuteursElliot-Portal, E, Laouafa, S, Arias-Reyes, C, Janes, TAdele, Joseph, V, Soliz, J
JournalSleep
Volume41
Issue7
Date Published2018 Jul 01
ISSN1550-9109
Abstract

Study Objectives: Based on the fact that erythropoietin (Epo) administration in rodents protects against spatial learning and cognitive deficits induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH)-mediated oxidative damage, here we tested the hypothesis that Epo in the brain protects against cardiorespiratory disorders and oxidative stress induced by CIH in adult mice.Methods: Adult control and transgenic mice overexpressing Epo in the brain only (Tg21) were exposed to CIH (21%-10% O2-10 cycles/hour-8 hours/day-7 days) or room air. After CIH exposure, we used the tail cuff method to measure arterial pressure, and whole-body plethysmography to assess the frequency of apneic episodes at rest, minute ventilation, and ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, the activity of pro-oxidant (XO-xanthine oxidase, and NADPH) and antioxidant (super oxide dismutase) enzymes was evaluated in the cerebral cortex and brainstem.Results: Exposure of control mice to CIH significantly increased the heart rate and arterial pressure, the number of apneic events, and the ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Furthermore, CIH increased the ratio of pro-oxidant to antioxidant enzymes in cortex and brainstem tissues. Both physiological and molecular changes induced by CIH were prevented in transgenic Tg21 mice.Conclusions: We conclude that the neuroprotective effect of Epo prevents oxidative damage in the brain and cardiorespiratory disorders induced by CIH. Considering that Epo is used in clinics to treat chronic kidney disease and stroke, our data show convincing evidence suggesting that Epo may be a promising alternative drug to treat sleep-disorder breathing.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsy072
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID29697839
PubMed Central IDPMC6047438