Longitudinal Changes in Cognition, Behaviours, and Functional Abilities in the Three Main Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Literature Review.

TitleLongitudinal Changes in Cognition, Behaviours, and Functional Abilities in the Three Main Variants of Primary Progressive Aphasia: A Literature Review.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
Authorsde la Sablonnière, J, Tastevin, M, Lavoie, M, Laforce, R
JournalBrain Sci
Volume11
Issue9
Date Published2021 Sep 14
ISSN2076-3425
Abstract

Primary progressive aphasias (PPAs) are a group of neurodegenerative diseases presenting with insidious and relentless language impairment. Three main PPA variants have been described: the non-fluent/agrammatic variant (nfvPPA), the semantic variant (svPPA), and the logopenic variant (lvPPA). At the time of diagnosis, patients and their families' main question pertains to prognosis and evolution, but very few data exist to support clinicians' claims. The objective of this study was to review the current literature on the longitudinal changes in cognition, behaviours, and functional abilities in the three main PPA variants. A comprehensive review was undertaken via a search on PUBMED and EMBASE. Two authors independently reviewed a total of 65 full-text records for eligibility. A total of 14 group studies and one meta-analysis were included. Among these, eight studies included all three PPA variants. Eight studies were prospective, and the follow-up duration was between one and five years. Overall, svPPA patients showed more behavioural disturbances both at baseline and over the course of the disease. Patients with lvPPA showed a worse cognitive decline, especially in episodic memory, and faster progression to dementia. Finally, patients with nfvPPA showed the most significant losses in language production and functional abilities. Data regarding the prodromal and last stages of PPA are still missing and studies with a longer follow-up observation period are needed.

DOI10.3390/brainsci11091209
Alternate JournalBrain Sci
PubMed ID34573229
PubMed Central IDPMC8466869