Quadriceps physiological response during the 1-min sit-to-stand test in people with severe COPD and healthy controls.

TitleQuadriceps physiological response during the 1-min sit-to-stand test in people with severe COPD and healthy controls.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsGephine, S, Mucci, P, Bielmann, M, Martin, M, Bouyer, LJ, Saey, D, Maltais, F
JournalSci Rep
Volume12
Issue1
Pagination794
Date Published2022 01 17
ISSN2045-2322
KeywordsAged, Exercise, Exercise Test, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Acuity, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Quadriceps Muscle, Sitting Position, Standing Position, Time Factors
Abstract

We compared quadriceps oxygenation and surface electromyography (sEMG) responses during the 1-min sit-to-stand (1STS) in 14 people with severe COPD and 12 controls, in whom cardiorespiratory response, near-infrared spectroscopy signals (oxy [Hb-Mb], deoxy [Hb-Mb], total [Hb-Mb], and SmO) and sEMG signals of the quadriceps were recorded. Time duration of each sit-to-stand cycle and the total work performed during the 1STS were measured. The quadriceps oxygenation parameters were normalized by reporting their values according to the total work during 1STS. The rate of sit-to-stand maneuvers decelerated in people with COPD leading to smaller total work compared with controls. The pattern of quadriceps oxygenation response during 1STS was similar between groups. However, in COPD, the recovery after 1STS was characterized by larger overshoots in oxy [Hb-Mb], total [Hb-Mb], and SmO. When corrected for the cumulative total work, the increase in muscle O extraction (deoxy [Hb-Mb]) during the first 30 s of recovery was greater in people with COPD compared to controls. Quadriceps sEMG changes suggestive of a fatiguing contraction pattern was observed only in people with COPD. All together, these results highlighted physiological misadaptation of people with severe COPD to the 1STS.

DOI10.1038/s41598-022-04820-z
Alternate JournalSci Rep
PubMed ID35039600
PubMed Central IDPMC8764045