Theta-Burst Stimulation of Forearm Muscles in Patients With Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Influence on Brain and Clinical Outcomes.

TitleTheta-Burst Stimulation of Forearm Muscles in Patients With Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Influence on Brain and Clinical Outcomes.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsDemers, FAllen, Zangrandi, A, Schneider, C
JournalFront Pain Res (Lausanne)
Volume2
Pagination736806
Date Published2021
ISSN2673-561X
Abstract

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a common pain condition characterized by the changes in the brain that are not yet addressed by conventional treatment regimens. Repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) of muscles is painless and non-invasive and can influence these changes (the induction of brain plasticity) to reduce pain and improve motricity. In patients with CRPS, this open-label pilot study tested rPMS after-effects on the pain intensity and sensorimotor control of the upper limb along with the excitability changes of the primary motor cortex (M1). Eight patients with CRPS were enrolled in a single-session program. Patients were tested at pre- and post-rPMS over the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle. The clinical outcomes were pain intensity, proprioception, active range of motion (ROM), and grip strength. M1 excitability was tested using the single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1. In our small sample study, rPMS reduced instant and week pain, improved proprioception and ROM, and reduced the hemispheric imbalance of several TMS outcomes. The more M1 contralateral to the CRPS side was hyperactivated at baseline, the more pain was reduced. This open-label pilot study provided promising findings for the use of rPMS in CRPS with a focus on M1 plastic changes. Future randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials should confirm the existence of a causal relationship between the TMS outcomes and post-rPMS decrease of pain. This will favor the development of personalized treatments of peripheral non-invasive neurostimulation in CRPS.

DOI10.3389/fpain.2021.736806
Alternate JournalFront Pain Res (Lausanne)
PubMed ID35295471
PubMed Central IDPMC8915654