Investigating psychological and physiological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test in young adults with insomnia.

TitleInvestigating psychological and physiological responses to the Trier Social Stress Test in young adults with insomnia.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsChen, IY, Jarrin, DC, Ivers, H, Morin, CM
JournalSleep Med
Volume40
Pagination11-22
Date Published2017 Dec
ISSN1878-5506
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Stress and hyperarousal both contribute to insomnia. Elevated stress-related sleep reactivity is associated with hyperarousal, and might constitute a vulnerability to future insomnia. The present study examined acute stress-induced arousal and its association with nocturnal sleep.METHODS: Participants were 30 healthy adults (66.7% female, M = 26.7 years): 10 with insomnia (INS) and 20 good sleepers with high vulnerability (HV) or low vulnerability (LV) to insomnia. They underwent two consecutive nights of polysomnography. During the evening preceding the second night, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was administered, and psychological and physiological arousal indices were assessed.RESULTS: The TSST elicited an increase in psychological and physiological arousal in all three groups. The INS group showed greater acute cortisol response (p < 0.05) and secretion at bedtime (p < 0.05), and higher pre-sleep cognitive arousal (p < 0.01) than the LV group; HV participants did not significantly differ from those in the INS or the LV group. Increased cortisol response and elevated sympathovagal imbalance (ie, low frequency/high frequency ratio) were each significantly associated with longer nocturnal awakenings (p = 0.048, p = 0.037, respectively). Heightened blood pressure was significantly associated with prolonged sleep onset latency, and reduced total sleep time and sleep efficiency (all ps < 0.05).CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the hyperarousal conceptualization of insomnia and indirectly suggest that increased stress reactivity and bedtime hyperarousal might represent a trait-like vulnerability in certain good sleepers. More research is warranted to validate and expand these preliminary findings.

DOI10.1016/j.sleep.2017.09.011
Alternate JournalSleep Med.
PubMed ID29221772